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How to stop constant snacking during coronavirus lockdown

by Malinda Johansen (2020-03-31)

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As the nation adapts to life in coronavirus shutdown, people across the country are being forced to establish new daily routines. 

Health and diet are proving particularly difficult to manage as our regular exercise regimes are disrupted and millions of us are working from home with constant access to our kitchens - and the treats within. 

Thousands of workers have taken to social media to reveal they are snacking more than ever and 'grazing' through the day now that the structure of the work day has been thrown into disarray. 

This could potentially lead to millions of people across the UK putting on weight, which is of particular concern in the current climate as obesity is recognised as a key risk factor for COVID-19. A rise in obesity also poses a long-term threat to the NHS. 

Speaking to FEMAIL, two UK-based nutritionists explained this apparent need to constantly eat is triggered by feelings of boredom, panic and anxiety brought on by fears surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic, and the government's life-changing measures to stop the spread. 

Tamara Willner, a nutritionist with Second Nature, 패션 a food plan backed by the NHS, and Jenny Tschiesche, a nutritional expert known as The Lunchbox Doctor, shared their advice on recognising, tackling and managing your diet in the long-term.






Thousands of workers have taken to social media to reveal they are snacking more than ever and 'grazing' through the day now that the structure of the work day has been thrown into disarray. Nutritionists reveal how to get your eating back under control. Stock image


WHY ARE WE SNACKING MORE? 

Tamara explained: 'Between stress around uncertainty, working from home, and reduced social interaction, emotional eating might be particularly prevalent in the coming weeks. 

'Emotional eating occurs when food is used to soothe or suppress negative emotions such as isolation, anger, boredom, or stress. 

'Often comfort or emotional eating ignore feelings of physical hunger that come from an empty stomach. The most common foods craved are usually ultra-processed, such as biscuits, crisps, chocolate, and ice cream. These foods are scientifically engineered to quickly target the pleasure receptors in our brains.






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'Most of us experience emotional eating at one time or another. However, when emotional eating happens frequently, and food becomes the primary coping mechanism for a stressful situation, it can affect our health and mental wellbeing. This emotional eating can be more likely when we're isolating ourselves.' 

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