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Author Guidelines

INSTRUCTIONS FOR PREPARING MANUSCRIPT

FOR PANDECTA: RESEARCH LAW JOURNAL

(2019 Template Version)

 

The manuscript which is submitted to Pandecta should consist of the following structure:

  1. The title of manuscript.
  2. Name of author [s] and affiliation.
  3. Abstract
  4. Introduction
  5. Method
  6. Result and Discussion
  7. Conclusion
  8. References

 

The title

It must be simple but covering all the content of the manuscript. It is strictly not allowed to put the Act and its attribute as a title nor the name of place of your research studied except the name of State or Country.

 

Abstract ← 12pt, Times New Roman bold

The abstract should be clear, concise, and descriptive. This abstract should provide a brief introduction to the problem, objective of paper, followed by a statement regarding the methodology and a brief summary of results. The abstract should end with a comment on the significance of the results or a brief conclusion. Abstracts are written in 12 pt Times New Roman, preferably not more than 300 words. If your article written in Bahasa please accompanying with the English translation.

 

Keywords:  ← 12pt, Times New Roman bold

Maximum of 5 keywords separated by semicolon (;), crucial to the appropriate indexing of the papers, are to be given. eg: Territory; Border; Dispute Settlement.

 

1. Introduction

12pt, Times New Roman bold with single space

 Perkembangan dan penggunaan teknologi informasi yang semakin pesat dewasa ini membawa dan memberikan dampak yang signifikan bagi seluruh lapisan masyarakat, dan termasuk juga adalah anak-anak. Teknologi berbasis informasi tersebut dipahami kemudian sebagai Internet. Mieke Komar Kantaatmadja menjelaskan: ”Teknologi internet semakin memudahkan setiap anak untuk berelasi dalam sebuah dunia maya yang bersifat abstrak universal, lepas dari keadaan, tempat dan waktu” (Kantaatmadja, 2002: 14) Internet membawa pada suatu keadaan yang tidak lagi memiliki pemisah ruang dan waktu. Salah satu keunggulan yang ditawarkan oleh Internet adalah kecepatan penyediaan dan perolehan informasi tersebut.

Namun demikian bagaikan satu mata uang yang memiliki dua sisi, maka Internet dan segala kecanggihan teknologi tentunya memberikan dampak lain yang cukup signifikan bagi lahirnya suatu kejahatan yang kemudian dapat memancing munculnya kerentanan bagi anak sebagai korban sekaligus pelaku dalam sebuah konstruksi kejahatan di dunia maya, melalui fasilitasnya yang online serta wireless. Dikdik M. Arief Mansur dan Elisatris Gultom menegaskan dampak penggunaan internet yang semakin banyak sangat berkaitan erat dengan pihak-pihak tertentu dalam melakukan tindak pidana. (Mansyur & Gultom, 2005: 95). Bentuk-bentuk kejahatan seperti pornografi, perjudian, pencurian, dan lain-lain dapat mempengaruhi tumbuh kembang anak pada usianya.

 

2. Methods

Metode Penelitian yang digunakan di dalam penulisan ini adalah metode penelitian hukum yuridis normatif, dengan menggunakan pendekatan statute approach dan conseptual approach. Yang dimaksud dengan statute approach adalah pendekatan yang didasarkan pada penelaahan peraturan hukum yang terkait dengan masalah yang dibahas. Peraturan hukum tersebuut yang menjadi bahan hukum primer di dalam penelitian ini. Pendekatan konseptual akan memberikan pemahaman dengan menggunakan doktrin-doktrin yang berupa pendapat para ahli hukum. Penulisan ini juga didasarkan pada hasil penelitian yang telah dilakukan terdahulu. Oleh karenanya untuk menganalisis permasalahan akan lebih bersifat komprehensif. Penalaran yang digunakan adalah penalaran yang bersifat deduksi yang pada akhirnya akan dapat dipergunakan untuk memecahkan permasalahan yang bersifat khusus (Ibrahim, 2004; Marzuki, 2009).

 

3.Results and Discussion

Results should be clear and concise. The results should summarize (scientific) findings rather than providing data in great detail. Please highlight differences between your results or findings and the previous publications by other researchers.

 The discussion should explore the significance of the results of the work, not repeat them. A combined Results and Discussion section is often appropriate. Avoid extensive citations and discussion of published literature.

In discussion, it is the most important section of your article. Here you get the chance to sell your data. Make the discussion corresponding to the results, but do not reiterate the results. Often should begin with a brief summary of the main scientific findings (not experimental results). The following components should be covered in discussion: How do your results relate to the original question or objectives outlined in the Introduction section (what)? Do you provide interpretation scientifically for each of your results or findings presented (why)? Are your results consistent with what other investigators have reported (what else)? Or are there any differences?

 

4. Conclusions

Conclusions should answer the objectives of research. Tell how your work advances the field from the present state of knowledge. Without clear Conclusions, reviewers and readers will find it difficult to judge the work, and whether or not it merits publication in the journal. Do not repeat the Abstract, or just list experimental results. Provide a clear scientific justification for your work, and indicate possible applications and extensions. You should also suggest future experiments and/or point out those that are underway.

 

5.  References

Cite the main scientific publications on which your work is based. Cite only items that you have read. Do not inflate the manuscript with too many references. Avoid excessive self‐citations. Avoid excessive citations of publications from the same region. Check each reference against the original source (authors name, volume, issue, year, DOI Number).

This journal is using the APA Reference style. Please read carefully the detail information on this in PART I-III below.

PART I

APA Referencing Basics: In-Text Citation

In-text references must be included following the use of a quote or paraphrase taken from another piece of work.

In-text citations are citations within the main body of the text and refer to a direct quote or paraphrase. They correspond to a reference in the main reference list. These citations include the surname of the author and date of publication only. Using an example author James Mitchell, this takes the form:

Mitchell (2017) states… Or …(Mitchell, 2017).

The structure of this changes depending on whether a direct quote or parenthetical used:

  • Direct Quote: The citation must follow the quote directly and contain a page number after the date, for example (Mitchell, 2017, p.104). This rule holds for all of the variations listed.
  • Parenthetical: The page number is not needed.

 

Two Authors:

The surname of both authors is stated with either ‘and’ or an ampersand between. For example:

Mitchell and Smith (2017) state… Or …(Mitchell & Smith, 2017).

Three, Four or Five Authors:

For the first cite, all names should be listed:

Mitchell, Smith, and Thomson (2017) state… Or …(Mitchell, Smith, & Thomson, 2017).

Further cites can be shorted to the first author’s name followed by et al:

Mitchell et al (2017) state… Or …(Mitchell et al, 2017).

Six or More Authors:

Only the first author’s surname should be stated followed by et al, see the above example.

No Authors:

If the author is unknown, the first few words of the reference should be used. This is usually the title of the source.

If this is the title of a book, periodical, brochure or report, is should be italicised. For example:

(A guide to citation, 2017).

If this is the title of an article, chapter or web page, it should be in quotation marks. For example:

(“APA Citation”, 2017).

Citing Authors With Multiple Works From One Year:

Works should be cited with a, b, c etc following the date. These letters are assigned within the reference list, which is sorted alphabetically by the surname of the first author. For example:

(Mitchell, 2017a) Or (Mitchell, 2017b).

Citing Multiple Works in One Parentheses:

If these works are by the same author, the surname is stated once followed by the dates in order chronologically. For instance:

Mitchell (2007, 2013, 2017) Or (Mitchell, 2007, 2013, 2017)

If these works are by multiple authors then the references are ordered alphabetically by the first author separated by a semicolon as follows:

(Mitchell  & Smith 2017; Thomson, Coyne, & Davis, 2015).

Citing a Group or Organisation:

For the first cite, the full name of the group must be used. Subsequently this can be shortened. For example:

First cite: (International Citation Association, 2015)

Further Cites: (Citation Association, 2015)

Citing a Secondary Source:

In this situation the original author and date should be stated first followed by ‘as cited in’ followed by the author and date of the secondary source. For example:

Lorde (1980) as cited in Mitchell (2017) Or (Lorde, 1980, as cited in Mitchell, 2017)

Citing Web Pages In Text

Cite web pages in text as you would any other source, using the author and date if known. If the author is not known, use the title and the date as the in-text citation (for long titles just use the first few words). Your in-text citation should lead your reader to the corresponding entry in the reference list. For sources with no date use n.d.(for no date) in place of the year: (Smith, n.d.). Below are examples of using in-text citation with web pages.


Web page with author:

In-text citation

Role-play can help children learn techniques for coping with bullying (Kraiser, 2011).

Reference entry

Kraizer, S. (2011). Preventing bullying. Retrieved from http://safechild.org/categoryparents/preventing-bullying/


Web page with no author:

In-text citation

The term Nittany Lion was coined by Penn State football player Joe Mason in 1904 ("All things Nittany," 2006).

Reference entry

All things Nittany. (2006). Retrieved from http://www.psu.edu/ur/about/nittanymascot.html


Web page with no date:

In-text citation

Establishing regular routines, such as exercise, can help survivors of disasters recover from trauma (American Psychological Association [APA], n.d.).

Reference entry

American Psychological Association. (n.d.). Recovering emotionally from disaster. Retrieved from http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/recovering-disasters.aspx

PART II

Reference List Citation Components

Reference list citations are the full citations for all of the in-text citations found in the body of a research project. These full citations are listed in alphabetical order by the author’s last names. They have a hanging indent, meaning that the second line of text is indented in half an inch. See examples below to see what a hanging indent looks like.

The format for citations varies based on the source type, but some citations use this general format:

Author’s Last name, First initial. (Date published). Title. Retrieved from URL

Learn more about each component of the reference citation and how to format it in the sections that follow.

Author’s Names

The names of authors are written in reverse order. Include the initials for the first and middle names. End this information with a period.

Last name, F. M.

Angelou, M.

Doyle, A. C.

Two or More Authors

When two or more authors work together on a source, write them in the order in which they appear on the source, using this format:

Last name, F. M., Last name, F. M., Last name, F. M., Last name, F. M., & Last name, F. M.

Kent, A. G., & Giles, R. M. Thorpe, A., Lukes, R., Bever, D. J, & He, Y.

If there are 8 or more authors listed on a source, only include the first 6 authors, add three ellipses, and then add the last author’s name.

Roberts, A., Johnson, M. C., Klein, J., Cheng, E. V., Sherman, A., Levin, K. K. , ...Lopez, G. S.

If you plan on using a free APA citation tool, such as Citation Machine, the names of the authors will format properly for you.

Publication Information

Directly after the author’s name is the date the source was published. Include the full date for newspapers, the month and year for magazine articles, and only the year for journals and all other sources. If no date is found on the source, include the initials, n.d. for “no date.”

Newspaper:

Narducci, M. (2017, May 19). City renames part of 11th Street Ed Snider Way to honor Flyers founder. The Philadelphia Inquirer. Retrieved from http://www.philly.com/

Titles

When writing out titles for books, articles, chapters, or other nonperiodical sources, only capitalize the first word of the title and the first word of the subtitle. Names of people, places, organizations, and other proper nouns also have the first letter capitalized.

For books and reports, italicize the title in the citation.

Examples:

Strange case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Roots: The saga of an American family.

For articles and chapters in APA referencing, do not italicize the title.

Examples:

Wake up the nation: Public libraries, policy making, and political discourse.

For newspapers, magazines, journals, newsletters, and other periodicals, capitalize the first letter in each word and italicize the title.

Example:

The Seattle Times.

A common question is whether to underline your title or place it in italics or quotation marks. In this citation style, titles are never underlined or placed in quotation marks. They are either placed in italics or not. Here’s a good general rule: When a source sits alone and is not part of a larger whole, place the title in italics. If the source does not sit alone and is part of a larger whole, do not place it in italics.

Books, movies, journals, and television shows are placed in italics since they stand alone. Songs on an album, episodes of television shows, chapters in books, and articles in journals are not placed in italics since they are smaller pieces of larger wholes.

Additional Information about the Title

If you feel it would be helpful to include additional information about the source type, include this information in brackets immediately following the title. Use a brief descriptive term and capitalize the first letter.

Example:

Kennedy, K., & Molen, G. R. (Producers), & Spielberg, S. (Director). (1993). Jurassic Park [Motion picture]. USA: Universal.

Besides [Motion picture], other common notations include:

  • [Audio podcast]
  • [Brochure]
  • [Letter to the editor]
  • [Television series episode]
  • [Tweet]
  • [Facebook page]
  • [Blog post]
  • [Lecture notes]
  • [PowerPoint presentation]
  • [Video file]

Information About the Publication

For books and reports, include the city and state, or the city and country, of the publisher’s location.

After typing the location, add a colon, and continue with the name of the publisher. It is not necessary to include the entire name of the publisher. It is acceptable to use a brief, intelligible form. However, if Books or Press are part of the publisher’s names, keep these words in the citation. Other common terms, such as Inc., Co., Publishers, and others can be omitted.

For newspapers, journals, magazines, and other periodicals, include the volume and issue number after the title. The volume number is listed first, by itself, in italics. The issue number is in parentheses immediately after it, not italicized.

Example:

Giannoukos, G., Besas, G., Hictour, V., & Georgas, T. (2016). A study on the role of computers in adult education. Educational Research and Reviews11(9), 907-923. http://dx.doi.org/10.5897/ERR2016.2688

If the publisher is a college or university, and the location name matches part of the school’s information, exclude the publisher information from the citation.

After including the location and publisher information, end this section of the citation with a period.

Examples:

London, England: Pearson.

New York, NY: Perseus Books.

 

Electronic Source Information:

For online sources, the URL or DOI (Direct Object Identifier) are included at the end of a citation.

DOI numbers are often created by publishers for journal articles and other periodical sources. They were created in response to the problem of broken or outdated links and URLs. When a journal article is assigned a DOI number, it is static, and will never change. Because of its permanent characteristic, DOIs are the preferred type of electronic information to include in APA citations. When a DOI number is not available, include the source’s URL.

For DOIs, include the number in this format:

http://dx.doi.org/xxxx

For URLs, type them in this format:

Retrieved from http://

Other information about electronic sources:

  • If the URL is longer than a line, break it up before a punctuation mark.
  • Do not place a period at the end of the citation.
  • It is not necessary to include retrieval dates, unless the source changes often over time (like in a Wikipedia article).
  • It is not necessary to include the names of databases

PART III

Citation Examples for Sources

Books:

Print Books with One Author:

Structure:

Author Last name, First initial. Middle initial. (Year Published). Title of work. Location: Publisher.

Example:

Dickens, C. (1942). Great expectations. New York, NY: Dodd, Mead.

Print Books with Two or More Authors:

Structure:

Last name, First initial. Middle initial., Last name, First initial. Middle initial., & Last name, First initial. Middle initial. (Date). Title. Location: Publisher.

Examples:

Goldin, C. D., & Katz, L. F. (2008). The race between education and technology. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.

Matthews, G., Smith, Y., & Knowles, G. (2009). Disaster management in archives, libraries and museums. Farnham, England: Ashgate.

Chapters in Books:

When citing a chapter in an edited book, use the following format:

Structure for Chapters in Edited Books in Print:

Last name of chapter author, First initial. Middle initial. (Year published). Chapter title. In First initial. Middle initial. Last name of Editor (Ed.), Book Title (pp. xx-xx). Publishing City, State: Publisher.

Example for Chapters in Edited Books in Print:

De Abreu, B.S. (2001). The role of media literacy education within social networking and the library. In D. E. Agosto & J. Abbas (Eds.), Teens, libraries, and social networking (pp. 39-48). Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO.

Structure for Chapters in Edited Books, found Online:

Last name of chapter author, First initial. Middle initial. (Year published). Chapter title. In First initial. Last name of Editor (Ed.), Book title [E-reader version, if used] (pp. xx-xx). doi:10.xxxx/xxxxxx or Retrieved from http://xxxx

Example for Chapters in Edited Books, found Online:

Lobo, R. F. (2003). Introduction to the structural chemistry of zeolites. In S. Auerbach, K. Carrado, & P. Dutta (Eds.), Handbook of zeolite science and technology (pp. 65-89). Retrieved from https://books.google.com

If you’re still unsure about how to cite a chapter in a book, use Citation Machine’s free citation generator to help you. Your citations will automatically format properly for you.

E-Books Found on a Website:

Structure:

Author Last Name, First initial. Middle initial. (Year Published). Title of work [E-reader version]. http://dx.doi.org/xxxx or Retrieved from http://xxxx

Example:

Auster, P. (2007). The Brooklyn follies [Nook version]. Retrieved from http://www.barnesandnoble.com/

E-Books found on a Database:

Reminder:

  • Only the first letter of the first word and any proper nouns in the title should be capitalized.
  • A DOI (digital object identifier) is basically a number that links a source to its location on the Internet. This number isn’t always provided, but if it is, it’s very important to include it in your citation.

Structure:

Author Last Name, First initial. Middle initial. (Year Published). Title of work. http://dx.doi.org/xxxx or Retrieved from http://xxxx

Example:

Baloh, P., & Burke, M. E. (2007). Attaining organizational innovations. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-72804-9_30

To cite your e-books automatically, use the “Book” form on Citation Machine, click “Manual entry mode,” and click the “E-book” tab. Citation Machine formats your citation properly following APA bibliography guidelines.

Journal articles in Print:

Structure:

Author Last name, First initial. Middle initial. (Year Published). Title of article. Title of Periodical, Volume(Issue), page range.

Example:

Gleditsch, N. P., Pinker, S., Thayer, B. A., Levy, J. S., & Thompson, W. R. (2013). The forum: The decline of war. International Studies Review, 15(3), 396-419.

Journal Articles Online:

  • If your source is found online, but there is no DOI provided, you can include the URL instead.
  • DOI (digital object identifier) is basically a number that links a source to its location on the Internet. This number isn’t always provided, but if it is, you should include it in your citation rather than including a URL.
  • Unlike previous editions, the 6th edition does not require including a retrieval date or date accessed for online sources. A retrieval date is only necessary if the source is likely to change (ex. Wikipedia).

Structure:

Author Last name, First initial. Middle initial. (Year Published). Title of article. Title of Periodical, Volume(Issue), page range. http://dx.doi.org/xxxx

Example:

Sahin, N. T., Pinker, S., Cash, S. S., Schomer, D., & Halgren, E. (2009). Sequential processing of lexical, grammatical, and phonological information within Broca’s area. Science, 326(5951), 445-449. http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/sicence.1174481

Newspaper Articles in Print:

Structure:

Author's Last name, First initial. Middle initial. (Year, Month Day Published). Title of article. Title of Newspaper, page range.

Example:

Frost, L. (2006, September 14). First passengers ride monster jet. The Salt Lake Tribune, p. A2.

Page numbers: If the article is only one page long, use ‘p.’ For any articles longer than one page, use ‘pp.’

  • If an article appears on non-sequential pages, separate each page number with a comma.
  • Example: pp. D4, D5, D7-D8

Newspaper Articles found Online:

Structure:

Author Last name, First initial. Middle initial. (Year, Month Date Published). Title of article. Title of Newspaper. Retrieved from newspaper homepage URL

Example:

Whiteside, K. (2004, August 31). College athletes want cut of action. USA Today. Retrieved http://www.usatoday.com

Magazine Articles in Print:

Structure:

Author Last Name, First initial. Middle initial. (Year, Month Published). Title of article. Title of Magazine, Volume(Issue), page range.

Example:

Quammen, D. (2008, December). The man who wasn’t Darwin. National Geographic Magazine, 214(6), 106.

Websites:

Structure:

Author Last Name, First initial. (Year, Month Date Published). Title of webpage. Retrieved from URL

Example of an APA format website:

Austerlitz, S. (2015, March 3). How long can a spinoff like ‘Better Call Saul’ last? Retrieved from http://fivethirtyeight.com/features/how-long-can-a-spinoff-like-better-call-saul-last/

Blogs:

Structure:

Last name, First initial. Middle initial. (Year, Month, Date of blog post). Title of blog post [Blog post]. Retrieved from URL

Example:

McClintock Miller, S. (2014, January 28). EasyBib joins the Rainbow Loom project as we dive into research with the third graders [Blog post]. Retrieved from http://vanmeterlibraryvoice.blogspot.com

On Citation Machine’s form for blogs, you have the option to choose from standard, audio, and video blogs. Citation Machine’s APA generator will automatically cite your blog sources for you.

Interviews

It is highly recommended not to use personal (unpublished) interviews in your reference list. Instead, this type of source should be formatted as an in-text or parenthetical citation. Here is an example of an in-text citation for a personal interview:

Structure: (Interviewee First initial., Last Name, personal communication, Date Interviewed)

Example: (D. Halsey, personal communication, December 12, 2011)

Published Interviews should be cited accordingly if they appear as journal articles, newspaper articles, television programs, radio programs, or films.

If your instructor requires a citation in the reference list, use the following structure:

Structure:

Last Name, First initial. Middle initial. of Individual being interviewed (Year, Month Day Interviewed). Interview by F. I. Last name [Format of interview].

Example:

Halsey, D. (2011, December 12). Interview by S. L. Ferguson [In-person].

If you are planning on using Citation Machine, a note is displayed above the form stating that personal interviews are not typically cited in text.

 

Doctoral Dissertations found on a Database:

Structure:

Last name, First initial. Middle initial. (Year published). Title of dissertation or thesis (Doctoral dissertation or Master’s thesis). Retrieved from Name of database. (Accession or Order No. xxxxxxx).

Example:

English, L. S. (2014). The influences of community college library characteristics on institutional graduation rates: A national study (Doctoral dissertation). Retrieved from American Doctoral Dissertations. (37CDD15DF659E63F).

If using Citation Machine, there is a form for dissertations that will automatically cite this source type for you.

Audio Podcasts:

Structure:

Last name, First initial. Middle initial. (Producer). (Year, Month Day). Title of podcast [Audio podcast]. Retrieved from URL

Example:

Goodwin, G. (Producer). (2016, February 11). History extra [Audio podcast]. Retrieved from http://www.historyextra.com/podcasts

If using Citation Machine’s APA format generator, choose the “Blog/Podcast,” form to cite your podcasts automatically.

YouTube Videos:

Structure:

Last name, First initial. Middle initial. [YouTube username]. (Year, Month Day of posting). Title of YouTube video [Video file]. Retrieved from URL

Example:

Damien, M. [Marcelo Damien]. (2014, April 10). Tiesto @ Ultra Buenos Aires 2014 (full set) [Video file]. Retrieved from https://youtu.be/mr4TDnR0ScM

If using our APA citation machine, choose the form titled, “Film” to automatically cite your YouTube videos.

Looking for a source type that is not on this guide? Here is another useful link to follow.

 

Submission Preparation Checklist

As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these guidelines.

  1. The submission has not been previously published, nor is it before another journal for consideration (or an explanation has been provided in Comments to the Editor).
  2. The submission file is in OpenOffice, Microsoft Word, RTF, or WordPerfect document file format.
  3. Where available, URLs for the references have been provided.
  4. The text adheres to the stylistic and bibliographic requirements outlined in the Author Guidelines, which is found in About the Journal.
  5. If submitting to a peer-reviewed section of the journal, the instructions in Ensuring a Blind Review have been followed.
 

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This journal charges the following author fees.

Article Submission: 0.00 (IDR)

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